Camp Hunt

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"The camping experiences of the children of the Wheeler Rescue Mission Ministries consisted of small groups of teens going to Winona Lake for weekend conferences or camperships to other church camps. These experiences did not fully meet the need of the inner-city children. A week-end was not long enough to accomplish the objective and these children with economic and social barriers were placed in unfair competition with church trained children."

~from a pre-1985 Camp Hunt brochure detailing the founding of Camp Hunt

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"The first camp for Wheeler Rescue Mission was held at McCormick’s Creek State Park near Spencer, Indiana in the summer of 1948. Seventy-one children, from the ages of seven to seventeen, were present. By 1958, the camp had grown to 220 in size, so the need for the  Mission to have it’s own camp was clear. In 1956 the Lazy Lake site consisting of 112 acres plus a 23 acre lake was the first purchase of land towards the dream of a camp. In the summer of 1959 the camp became a reality." 

 

The back of the photograph below reads: 

“Picture shows Forrest Christ, Pres. of Christian Men Builders Class of 3rd Christian Church, 17th & Broadway, presenting to Leonard C. Hunt, Supt. of the Wheeler City Rescue Mission, a check for $1000.00 to be used as a Merle Sidner Memorial Gift to the Youth Camp in construction. This gift marked ‘kitchen.’

Mr. Christ’s expression is one of delight in being able to surprise Mr. Hunt (whose expression should show how ‘flabbergasted’ he was at this enjoyable surprise). Mr. Hunt was the regular teacher of C.M.B. for three years after the death of Dr. Benson.”

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Children attending camp wrote thank you letters to the sponsors who either donated goods or helped pay for them to go to camp. 

Explore the documents:

Click through to read the letters.

 

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The back of this photograph reads: “These junior age boys enjoy outdoor activities. In the city, they do not have an opportunity to learn to row a boat or canoe.”

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The back of this photograph reads: “The girls in this photo are between the ages of nine and eleven. Swimming daily in Lazy Lake is a favorite activity. These inner-city girls do not have easy access to a swimming pool in their neighborhoods.”

Camp Hunt